Vietnam War Correspondent Joe Galloway and Support for Women Veterans with TBI

The Making of The Vietnam War Film with War Correspondent Joe Galloway

The voice of Americas Veterans
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Joe Galloway News Correspondent during Vietnam War
Joe Galloway, Vietnam War Correspondent

Don’t miss Veterans Radio this Sunday, 1 October 2017. Call in during the program to share your thoughts on the film. 734-822-1600

Our guests include Joe Galloway, who served as a consultant on Ken Burn’s “Vietnam” documentary. Now that the series is released to the public, Joe will discuss what the  reaction has been and provide some insights into the way the film was made.

Joe is the co-author of “We Were Soldiers Once And Young”. As a war correspondent during the Vietnam War,  he often worked alongside the American troops he covered. He was awarded a Bronze Star Medal in 1998, for carrying a badly wounded man to safety while he was under very heavy enemy fire in 1965.

Women in the US Military and TBI

WOmen in the US MilitaryJoin us for a revealing conversation with Arlene Callaghan, Director of Women Supporting Women Veterans (WSWVETS), Diane Dugan, Program Outreach Coordinator, Brain Injury Association of Michigan, and Mary, a Brain Injury Survivor.

Women in the U.S. military are technically barred from serving in certain combat specialties, positions, or units; however, since Operation Desert Storm, women have served in forward positions in greater numbers. This increased involvement in combat zones has resulted in exposures to trauma, injury, and a myriad of environmental hazards associated with modern war. Some of these hazards present new health risks specifically relevant to women who have been deployed to or recently returned from Iraq or Afghanistan or both.

It is difficult to return home from an intensive combat environment. It takes a lot of understanding and patience on the home front as our troops return to their civilian lives. In many cases, they may Brain Injury Association of Michigannever be completely the same. It is even tougher for those who have sustained a TBI during their combat tour, especially if they do not seek diagnosis and treatment. It is critical that family members, close friends and co-workers of troops returning from combat understand and watch for TBI and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms.

 

 

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